Age-Related Changes In The Daily Rhythm of Photoreceptor Functioning And Circuitry In A Melatonin-Proficient Mouse Strain

This is an interesting study in PLoS One examining the involvement of melatonin in the retina, particularly in the survival of retinal neurons through aging studies in CH3-f+/+ mice, a melatonin proficient mouse strain.  As expected, certain physiological measures (a and b waves) are lost during aging, and in particular, the daily circadian rhythms of those measures.  However, the authors, Kenkichi Baba, Francesca Mazzoni, Sharon Owino, Susana Contreras-Alcantara, Enrica Strettoi and Gianluca Tosini did something really interesting and added exogenous melatonin to their assay and concluded that responsiveness of exogenous melatonin is also reduced during aging.

Photovoltaic Retinal Prosthesis With High Pixel Density

Retinas are complex systems and engineered rescues of vision loss through bionic means have to date been inelegant solutions.  Retinal bionic implants have historically not been successes due to some glaring problems including how to power them and how to get the appropriate current close enough to the cells to induce a response.  However, researchers at Stanford University and University of California, Santa Cruz have now developed a photovoltaic retinal prosthesis that is wirelessly powered which eliminates one of the biggest hurdles on the viability of bionic Continue reading “Photovoltaic Retinal Prosthesis With High Pixel Density”

Notable Paper: Network Deficiency Exacerbates Impairment in a Mouse Model of Retinal Degeneration

This paper by Christopher W. Yee, Abduqodir H. Toychiev and Botir T. Sagdullaev examines the role that neural oscillations play in normal and pathological states.  In a neurodegenerative model of retinitis pigmentosa, the authors examined the activity of neural networks in the rd1 mouse model and compared that activity to the wild type.   Continue reading “Notable Paper: Network Deficiency Exacerbates Impairment in a Mouse Model of Retinal Degeneration”

Dysmorphic Photoreceptors in a P23H Mutant Rhodopsin Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa Are Metabolically Active and Capable of Regenerating to Reverse Retinal Degeneration

This paper (and the cover article) is the result of a collaborative effort between Damian C. Lee, Felix R. Vazquez-Chona, W. Drew Ferrell, Beatrice M. Tam, Bryan W. JonesRobert E. Marc, and Orson L. Moritz.

Continue reading “Dysmorphic Photoreceptors in a P23H Mutant Rhodopsin Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa Are Metabolically Active and Capable of Regenerating to Reverse Retinal Degeneration”

Nerve Fiber Layer (Nikon Small World Winner)

This years Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition features some amazing work including this laser confocal image of a mouse nerve fiber layer on a retinal flatmount at 40X magnification by Gabriel Luna out of the Steve Fisher and Geoff Lewis’s retinal cell biology group at UC Santa Barbara Neuroscience Research Institute.

To see all of the images from this year’s competition, Boston.com’s The Big Picture has all of the stunning array of imagery.  Congratulations to Gabe on his efforts and look for more of their fantastic imagery here on Webvision in the near future.

Thanks to The Click for emailing us this link.

 

Retina, 2002 from Deborah Aschheim

We here at Webvision love art, particularly scientific art or scientifically inspired art.  Friend of Webvision, Nancy Parmalee pointed “Retina” out the other day on Twitter and it turns out “Retina” is/was an art installation in 2002 by Deborah Aschheim at the Pasadena Armory Center for the Arts.  I don’t know if it is still in place.  Any additional information from the community on this installation or on its current status would be appreciated.

100 Papers You Should Read: Visual Pigments of Single Goldfish Cones

This is the fourth paper in the category, 100 Papers You Should Read (in vision science).

William Rushton once said “The trouble with colour vision is the mentality of those that write on it-and of those that read.  In most aspects of physiology it is sufficient to offer a fairly plausible and adequate hypothesis; but colour visionaries want nothing less than the truth.  The cause of this unreasonable demand lies in this, that whereas nearly all the phenomena of nature are simply observed, those of sensory physiology can also be experienced.  So in colour vision we perceive the essential hollowness of formal scientific explanation.”

Continue reading “100 Papers You Should Read: Visual Pigments of Single Goldfish Cones”

Light-Evoked Synaptic Activity of Retinal Ganglion and Amacrine Cells is Regulated in Developing Mouse Retina

This paper by Q. He, Wang P and Ning Tian characterizes the developmental profiles of the light evoked excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs from ON and OFF synaptic pathways in the retina, the light evoked synaptic outputs and the sensitivity of the light evoked synaptic inputs and outputs to light deprivation of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and displaced amacrine cells (ACs) of developing mouse retina.  The results strongly suggest that spontaneous and light-evoked synaptic activities of RGCs and ACs are regulated by different synaptic mechanisms.

Continue reading “Light-Evoked Synaptic Activity of Retinal Ganglion and Amacrine Cells is Regulated in Developing Mouse Retina”

100 Papers You Should Read: Synaptic Relationships in the Plexiform Layers of Carp Retina

This is the third paper in the category, 100 Papers You Should Read (in vision science).

This paper, Synaptic Relationships in the Plexiform Layers of Carp Retina by Paul Witkovsky and John Dowling along with a previous one, Dowling and Boycott, 1966, began to set the stage for investigations into the circuitry of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and it has only been fairly recently that this work been confirmed and extended. Continue reading “100 Papers You Should Read: Synaptic Relationships in the Plexiform Layers of Carp Retina”