Webvision Traveling To ARVO 2019

Webvision is off to ARVO 2019! We look forward to seeing the latest in retinal and vision research, talking with colleagues, and entertaining ideas for new chapters in Webvision from the community. Find us at the meeting via Twitter (@Webvision1) and propose an idea!

Looking forward to seeing you there.

New Postdoctoral Opportunity, University at Louisville

There are two postdoctoral opportunities in the laboratory of Maureen McCall at the University of Louisville.

 

    • Post Doctoral fellowships to work on animal-based research into inhibitory subunit receptor specific inhibition in the visual responses of retinal ganglion cells. We plan to use optical, molecular (including AAV manipulation of protein expression), and electrophysiological tools to understand the roles of different glycine receptor subunits in the visually evoked responses of retinal ganglion cells.
    • The McCall Laboratory is part of the University of Louisville Vision Science Center, which is a research group of 7 individuals who study visual function throughout the CNS. We are a multidisciplinary group whose research includes both basic and applied topics, involving visual processing in normal and diseased retina as well as other central visual targets. The VSC members have ongoing collaborations across labs.
    • The McCall has several on-going collaborations both within and outside University of Louisville and publications from the lab appear in a variety of neuroscience and vision related journals.
    • Two post docs are sought to join an going project, that has just received 5 years of funding from the NEI. In the project we will continue to examine the role of glycinergic inhibition in shaping the visual responses of retinal ganglion cells, a long term focus of the McCall lab. We will manipulate the expression of glycine subunit using molecular techniques and viral vectors. Experience in electrophysiological techniques, specifically whole cell patch clamp is required, although experience in retinal neuroscience is NOT. The opportunity to learn molecular biological, biochemical and imaging approaches is available.

 

Requirements:

ONLY PhDs with experience in electrophysiological and/or single cell functional imaging will be considered.

 

Other important requirements:

Highly motivated, team players.

Solid publication record.

Experience with whole cell patch clamp recordings.

All levels of experience are welcome and salary is commensurate with experience (NIH postdoctoral salary scale).

 

Application instructions:

 

Please send your CV which includes the name and contact information of at least two references , to:

 

Mo.mccall@louisville.edu

Webvision Updates: Now A Responsive Site

In Webvision news, we have gone through some changes here, mostly under the hood, though some will have changed the appearance of Webvision subtly.

Webvision has now migrated to a new server.  Most of the lifetime of Webvision has been running on Macintosh OSs of various flavors.  But with the deprecation of Apache in the latest OS X Server, the writing was on the wall and I moved Webvision to a new server, running Linux.  My thanks to the Moran Eye Center for helping with the costs of securing a new server.

Additionally, with consulting help from Anesti Creative, we have optimized Webvision, creating a responsive website for more platforms and increased the security, which these days unfortunately is necessary given the increased number of attacks literally every minute of the day from around the world.

We have endeavored to make this as easy as possible for end users, and hopefully these changes will result in an easier to use website, particularly from mobile devices and tablets.

Retinal Capillaries

Question: How small can the blood vessels in our retinas get?

Answer: Smaller than the diameter of a red blood cell (~6-8µm wide).

The red blood cells have to fold themselves to get through the tightest of spaces and line up, single file to get through the smallest retinal capillaries.

Image originally posted here.

David Carpenter, Maker Of Glass Eyes

Ocularists are specialists that mix art and science to create artificial eyes.  The profession has existed since the 5th century and is one we don’t often hear about, yet it is a service for people to create a cosmetic artificial replacement eye that is tremendously important. We’ve featured the work of David Carpenter before here on Webvision, and now there is a wonderful post over on Spitalfields Life about David Carpenter, the Chief Ocularist at the Moorfields Eye Hospital with wonderful photography by Patricia Niven (@PatriciaNiven).

Paul Witkovsky, Vision Scientist, Artist

PaulWitkovsky painting

Many vision scientists seem to have a penchant for creating art, and Dr. Paul Witkovsky is no exception.  Paul is a famous vision scientist that spent most of his career at NYU New York City in the department of Ophthalmology. His research spanned the fields of retinal physiology, retinal ultrastructure and pharmacology.

His major contribution has been in trying to understand the role of dopamine in the retina and its role in light adaptation and cone vision.  This work he has passed on to his academic progeny including David Krizaj here at the Moran Eye Center, Bill Brunken at SUNY and Jozsef Vigh at Colorado State University.

Paul has always been a “renaissance man” interested in travel, languages, music and art as well as science.  Above, you can see one of his recent abstract paintings (acrylic).

What It Looks Like To Be Colorblind, Part II


Screen-Shot-2016-09-07-at-7.17.37-PM

We’ve linked to posts before about what it looks like to people who are colorblind complete with animated gifs, but there is a new resource of gifs from the U.K.’s Clinic Compare that have a more film like quality and include a wider variety of color blindness forms.  We include a number of them below including green-blind/Deuteranopia, blue cone monochromacy, red-weak protanomaly, blue-blind/tritanomaly, green-weak deuteranomaly, monochromacy/acrhomatopsia, red-blind protanopia, and red-weak protanomaly.

gifs are rather large, so give them time to upload.

ht: @boingboing for the link.

Continue reading “What It Looks Like To Be Colorblind, Part II”

TRPV4 Regulates Calcium Homeostasis, Cytoskeletal Remodeling, Conventional Outflow and Intraocular Pressure

Krizaj glaucoma

Glaucoma is the main cause of irreversible blindness in the world. In most common types of the disease, the optic nerve is damaged by an increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) which blocks fluid drainage through canals in the eye. There is currently no cure, however, the disease can be treated by lowering IOP. Unfortunately, all IOP-lowering drugs that in the market today target the secondary drainage pathway which mediates only 5-15% of fluid outflow. Therefore, the main goal in glaucoma research has been to identify targets in the primary outflow pathway mediated through the trabecular meshwork tissue. David Krizaj’s group at the Moran Eye Institute (University of Utah School of Medicine) has done just that.

In a paper just published in Scientific Reports, they identify TRPV4, a mechanosensitive ion channel, as the main trabecular target of increased IOP. This highly collaborative project combined genetic, molecular, whole animal approaches with bioengineered nanoscaffold models of glaucoma and drug discovery to show that activation of the channel mimics the trabecular changes in glaucoma whereas elimination of the TRPV4 gene or systemic exposure to TRPV4 inhibitors protected mice from the disease. In collaboration with Glenn Prestwich’s group in Medicinal Chemistry at the University of Utah, the team synthesized new eye drops which lowered IOP to levels seen in control mice. By targeting the primary outflow pathway, this study promises to bring new, effective cures that complement current glaucoma treatment. The primary authors of the study are Dr. Dan Ryskamp, Amber Frye and Dr. Tam Phuong.

Off To ARVO 2016

Porthole

We are off to ARVO 2016 in Seattle, Washington to participate in the largest gathering of vision scientists and ophthalmologists in the world.  It’s the annual meeting of researchers and clinicians presenting and discussing all things vision and ophthalmology.

If you are going to be at ARVO and want to meet up, leave us a comment here or send a Tweet to @Webvision1 and if you are on Twitter, be sure to use the #ARVO2016.

Look forward to seeing you there.

 

 

SciShow: How Different Animals and Insects Visually Process the World Around Them

This is a fun and pretty accurate Youtube video on how different animals (vertebrates and invertebrates) visually process the world.  There is so much to learn from the evolution of the eye and we here on Webvision are always happy to see basic science and the science of vision being communicated to the wider public.

Note: I first saw this on a Laughing Squid blog entry. Lori Dorn posts the best articles there.