100 Papers You Should Read: Molecular Genetics of Human Color Vision: The Genes Encoding Blue, Green, and Red Pigments

This is the fifth paper in the category, 100 Papers You Should Read (in vision science). This paper in the journal Science by Jeremy Nathans, Darcy Thomas and David Hogness in the genetics of human vision is a landmark paper in our understanding of how color vision works.

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100 Papers You Should Read: Visual Pigments of Single Goldfish Cones

This is the fourth paper in the category, 100 Papers You Should Read (in vision science).

William Rushton once said “The trouble with colour vision is the mentality of those that write on it-and of those that read.  In most aspects of physiology it is sufficient to offer a fairly plausible and adequate hypothesis; but colour visionaries want nothing less than the truth.  The cause of this unreasonable demand lies in this, that whereas nearly all the phenomena of nature are simply observed, those of sensory physiology can also be experienced.  So in colour vision we perceive the essential hollowness of formal scientific explanation.”

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100 Papers You Should Read: Synaptic Relationships in the Plexiform Layers of Carp Retina

This is the third paper in the category, 100 Papers You Should Read (in vision science).

This paper, Synaptic Relationships in the Plexiform Layers of Carp Retina by Paul Witkovsky and John Dowling along with a previous one, Dowling and Boycott, 1966, began to set the stage for investigations into the circuitry of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and it has only been fairly recently that this work been confirmed and extended. Continue reading “100 Papers You Should Read: Synaptic Relationships in the Plexiform Layers of Carp Retina”

100 Papers You Should Read: DETECTION AND RESOLUTION OF VISUAL STIMULI BY TURTLE PHOTORECEPTORS

This is the first entry in the category, 100 Papers You Should Read (in vision science).  It is a concept borrowed from Robert Marc in a series of lab meetings he held.  Those lab meetings were so valuable in contextualizing current understanding of vision science that we would like to share some of the papers discussed in them with you.  There will be a new manuscript posted here every two weeks in the hopes of generating discussion and helping to show where we have come from in vision science.

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