Notable Paper: Paired-Pulse Plasticity In The Strength and Latency of Light-Evoked Lateral Inhibition to Retinal Bipolar Cell Terminals

Paired Pulse plasticity

I’ve been doing some reading in plasticity recently and found this paper in the Journal of Neuroscience by Evan Vickers, Mean-Hwan Kim, Jozsef Vigh, and Henrique von Gersdorff published last summer that looks at short term plasticity in the Inner Plexiform Layer mediating light adaptation.  Working in goldfish (Carassius auratus auratus) retina (an amazing retina), Vickers et. al. used patch clamp recordings on Mb bipolar cell terminals with paired-pulse light stimulation.  The idea was to examine and quantify plasticity in GABAergic lateral IPSCs with findings that show variation in the synaptic strength and latencies which correspond to adaptation and sensitization to surround temporal contrast.  The authors found that there are separate retinal circuitry pathways, each with differing mechanisms of plasticity that help to tune temporal response curves with glutamate release from ON bipolar cell terminals.  They conclude that “Short-term plasticity of L-IPSCs may thus influence the strength, timing, and spatial extent of amacrine and ganglion cell inhibitory surrounds”.

 

100 Papers You Should Read: DETECTION AND RESOLUTION OF VISUAL STIMULI BY TURTLE PHOTORECEPTORS

This is the first entry in the category, 100 Papers You Should Read (in vision science).  It is a concept borrowed from Robert Marc in a series of lab meetings he held.  Those lab meetings were so valuable in contextualizing current understanding of vision science that we would like to share some of the papers discussed in them with you.  There will be a new manuscript posted here every two weeks in the hopes of generating discussion and helping to show where we have come from in vision science.

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